XIII

This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God. John 11:4 (KJV)

But sickness, we must always remember, is no sign that God is displeased with us; no, more, it is generally sent for the good of our souls. It tends to draw our affections away from this world, and to direct them to things above. It sends us to our Bibles, and teaches us to pray better. It helps to prove our faith and patience, and shows us the real value of our hope in Christ. It reminds us that we are not to live always, and tunes and trains our hearts for our great change. Then let us be patient and cheerful when we are laid aside by illness. Let us believe that the Lord Jesus loves us when we are sick no less than when we are well.

Ryle, J. (1857) Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Monergism Books, pg. 2021

XII

“Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you.” Luke 6:27 (ESV)

God has become our all-satisfying treasure and so we don’t trust our adversaries out of our own sense of need and insecurity, but out of our own fullness with the satisfying glory of God.

John Piper, retrieved from https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/why-we-should-love-our-enemies

XI

(they) answered, “No one ever spoke like this man!” John 7:46 (ESV)

It would be well for the Church of Christ if ministers and teachers of religion would strive more to speak after their Lord’s pattern. Let them remember that elegant bombastic language, and a sensational, theatrical style of address, are utterly unlike their Master. Let them realize, that an eloquent simplicity is the hightest attainment of public speaking.

Ryle, J. (1857) Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Monergism Books, pg. 1789

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