Mourning into Joy | Palm Sunday: Sovereign Mercy | Holy Week | Devotional Series | Part 2 of 10

Nothing demonstrates the compassionate omniscience of Christ as the minutes detailing His entrance into Jerusalem. Knowing everything is one thing, but choosing to have compassion over it, is something altogether wonderful and strange. Christ being truly God knew what lie ahead as He walked into Jerusalem. He knew that He will be rejected. He knew that He was going to be crucified by the same people who were cheering for Him. Yet He welcome it all. He healed them. He taught them. He did everything despite knowing quite well that His actions and His words were falling on blind and deft ears. He knew that the people who came to Him, came merely because they want to be healed and to be free from the Roman rule. They did not want Christ, they only wanted to use Him. And that is a disappointment that even I can attest and relate. I have walked out of many situations, relationships, and social arrangements where I have felt that I was merely being used. And if I, with my own limited knowledge could feel utterly bad for not being wanted for who I am (but only for my benefit), I cannot even begin to imagine how a sovereign God must’ve felt. But Christ’s disappointment was far greater than mine, because His concern wasn’t limited to personal rejection. The Apostles say, Christ wept over Jerusalem because they had rejected salvation itself. (Matt 23:37-39, Luke 19:41-44) Most of us would walk away, as I mentioned. But Christ, a Sovereign God – on whose will the world functions, neither abandoned nor annihilate those people – yet chose to have compassion. And that is quite a contradicting quality, but the beauty of Christ is that – He unites this all-powerful control with great compassion and mercy.

This Palm Sunday, I wish to focus on that – mercy, or more precisely – Sovereign Mercy. Because I don’t know about you dear reader, but I seem to need more and more. I don’t want to focus on what Christ can do for me. I want to focus on what He has done. Because I have always been selfish. I am no better than the people of Jerusalem who rejected Him. I have only come to Him when my health fails, or when my career is waning. I am quick to forget about the price He paid to satisfy the wrath of God – so that we can enjoy His mercy. I am quick to forget that He chose to die despite knowing well we would reject Him and continue to live in ways that dishonors Him. But my dear readers, if He can walk into Jerusalem. He can walk into our lives too. If He can make stones shout out His praises. (Lk 19:40) He can surely turn our stone-cold hearts into God-honoring flesh. (Eze 36:26, Heb 8:10) So, let us focus on His mercy this Sunday. And let us not forget how privilege we are, that we are protected in His love, compassion, and mercy. To God be the Glory.


Wishing you and your family, a very blessed Palm Sunday. Hopefully, you’ll be back tomorrow. And we’ll meet again. Until then, Shalom!


Series Index: (1) Introduction: Why Observe the Holy Week

Mourning into Joy | Introduction: Why Observe the Holy Week | Holy Week | Devotional Series | Part 1 of 10

Observing the Holy Week has always been a polarizing ritual for me. Because, I’ve always felt it to be a virtue-signing act. Perhaps that is my own inner crookedness, that I cannot accept that anyone could even observe this ritual genuinely. Secondly, and this used to be my go-to excuse – (that) the scriptures never made it mandatory. But as I grow older, and as I learn to spend more time meditating in the scriptures – I find that it is not I but Christ that leads me into discipline and obedience towards holiness. (Matt 19:26) In other words, it is not by our strength, but by the virtue of God’s grace that we can genuinely observe the Holy Week to its full effect.

Though it is also true that the scripture does not make it an obligation to observe the Holy Week, but it sure does – undeniably builds us up towards it. The Old Testaments swells up to this point. This is the week, when the promise of salvation was about to be materialized. The Devil was to use all its might, the saints were to see the last of the trying times as sinners-unrepentant, and Christ – God, Christ was to lead us through this darkness – like YHWH led the Israelites through the parted Red Sea. The Holy Week, this ordinary week, may not mean much to the world, but for the believer it is nothing less than historic. Apparently, that’s why, all the four Apostles dedicated a major part of the Gospel to this week (alone). Because it was during the course of this week – that Christ changed our fate. He suffered everything we were meant to suffer. And showed us what obedience and perseverance meant. He took the wrath of God for us, and showed us – it is He – who was to come – and paid the full payment of our sins. And most importantly, it was during this week – He demonstrated the Father’s love for us – and bought us the prerequisite holiness to be united with God.

But beyond these reasons – that are grounded in the Biblical past, there is one that I find absolutely convincing. The reason why we should observe the Holy Week is because this is a wonderful opportunity for us to walk with Ekklesia – the body of Christ. David Mathis explains this better. He writes,

“Marking Holy Week is not an obligation, but it is an opportunity. It is a chance to walk with the church, throughout time and through the world, as she walks with her Bridegroom through the most important week in the history of the world. It is a chance to focus our minds on, and seek to intensify our affections for, the most important and timeless realities.” (Pg. 1)

How wonderful that is. I hope dear reader, that you’ll join me in relishing this wonderful opportunity – in walking with Christ and His Church, this Holy Week. Blessed Greetings.


NOTE: Daily Devotions will start from Palm Sunday i.e. 5th April ’20, 9 AM (IST). And end on Easter Sunday i.e. 12th April ’20. You can also subscribe the blog via email to receive the devotionals directly in your inbox.   

Peace, Love, & Joy | God with us | Christmas Special | Devotional Series | Part 26 of 27 | December 25, 2019

and they shall call his name Immanuel (which means, God with us)” – Matthew 1:23 (ESV)

The only way, a Holy God could be with a sinful creature like us, was by Christ laying down His life to propitiate the wrath of God. And that is exactly what Jesus came to do. He came to grant us forgiveness of our sin, and to initiate us towards a new life. And so, the only reason way we could once again be with God, is because Jesus came down for us.

But the message of Christmas does not end here. If Christ came to abolish sin, we who profess to be forgiven, cannot continue to live in sin. We cannot say, ‘God is with me’ while we continue to live in sin. If we continue to live in sin, that is a clear indicator that we are not with God, but with sin. The Apostle John writes, “Whoever makes a practice of sinning is of the devil.” (1Jn 3:8, ESV) If we say ‘God is with me’ it will show in our pursuit of the New Life. “This means that anyone who belongs to Christ has become a new person. The old life is gone; a new life has begun!” (2Cor 5:17, NLT) Finally, if we say ‘God is with me’ it will show in what we treasure. “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you” (1Pe 1:3-4, ESV)

Every year we celebrate, Christ’s descend to be with us. But we seldom check, if that “us” includes “you and I“. And I suppose, it is healthy to check ourselves in accordance to what the scripture says. If I am of God, and God is with me, it will show in three aspects of my life. One, I will not persist in sin. Two, I will pursue godliness. And finally, three, I will have (heavenly) hope of eternal life. But I want to take a moment here, and remind you. Yes, there are times we falter. And no, no one is perfect. But that shouldn’t discourage us. If we say we believe in Christ. We should also believe that He also grants us the grace to pursue such holy living. “By his divine power, God has given us everything we need for living a godly life. We have received all of this by coming to know him, the one who called us to himself by means of his marvelous glory and excellence.” (2Pe 1:3, NLT) Let us pray and hope that Christmas this year, would empower us to live holier lives.    


Read previous entries in this Series:

(i) Introduction: What Christ wants this Christmas (ii) December 1: Prepare the Way (iii) December 2: Mary’s Magnificent God (iv) December 3: The Confidence of Redeeming Hope (v) December 4: A Big God for Little People (vi) December 5: What He Willed to do (vii) December 6: Peace to those with whom He is pleased (viii) December 7: Messiah of all (ix) December 8: Christ is Central in Christmas(x) December 9: Two Kinds of Oppositions (xi) December 10: Our Treasure (xii) December 11: Why Jesus came (xiii) December 12: Replacing the Shadows (xiv) December 13: Christ, the Real Thing, the Perfect Priest (xv) December 14: Making Transformation Real (xvi) December 15: Abundant Life (xvii) December 16: An Unlikely Route to Victory (xviii) December 17: Freedom & Joy Secured in Him (xix) December 18: Pass Me Not (xx) December 19: Overcoming the Power of Death (xxi) December 20: Salvation Unites Us (xxii) December 21: LOGOS (xxiii) December 22: The Importance of Awe (xxiv) December 23: Secured from False Preachers (xxv) December 24: Why the Son Appeared

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